Population Health and Environment

Previous Population-Environment Interactions

Environment, Population, and Health Dynamics

 

Yifan (Flora) He

Yifan
category
graduate student associates
Bren School of Environmental Science and Management
UC Santa Barbara
Broom Center Affiliation(s)

Graduate Student Fellow

Yifan (Flora) He is an environmental social scientist and doctoral student at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. She studies rural land governance in the Global South using a combination of political science theory, causal inference methods, and geospatial tools. Current projects include the relationship between rural out-migration and land governance in South America, and the social and environmental impacts of collective tenure regimes in Brazil.

Prior to UCSB, she worked as a social scientist at Conservation International. She holds a Bachelor of Social Sciences from the University of Hong Kong in 2015 and a Master of Science in conservation ecology and environmental informatics from the University of Michigan in 2017.

Katie McMahon

Katie McMahon
category
graduate student associates
Department of Geography
UC Santa Barbara
Broom Center Affiliation(s)

Graduate Student Fellow

Katie McMahon is an MA/PhD student in the Geography Department with research interests at the intersection of climate & environmental change, social vulnerability, human health, and food & water security. Katie holds a BA in Geography and Global Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her PhD advisor is Kathy Baylis. Katie's current work uses integrated climate and demographic data sources to explore the impacts of contemporary climate change on food security outcomes in South Asia. She is particularly interested in disentangling the multiple mechanisms through which climate shocks influence health, as well as identifying social determinants of nutritional vulnerability to climate change.

Nicole Thompson González

Nicole Thompson González
category
research associates
Anthropology
University of California, Santa Barbara
Manager, Biobehavioral Health Laboratory at UCSB

Nicole Thompson González is a behavioral ecologist and evolutionary primatologist in the Department of Anthropology. Her work draws from evolutionary biology, animal behavior, sociology, and public health to examine the multiple links between sociality, health, and biological fitness in human and non-human primates. Her work on wild primates in East Africa provides models of the social and developmental drivers of health inequalities from the individual to the population level, by pairing long-term behavioral and ecological data with biomarkers of health status. Further, her work centers life history theory as a framework to evaluate the costs and benefits of social relationships and community dynamics throughout the life course. She currently manages the Biobehavioral Health Laboratory at UCSB, performing and overseeing several assay techniques. Her current research focuses on immune regulation as a powerful pathway by which individuals embody social experience.

Michelle Brown

Michelle Brown
category
research associates
Anthropology
University of California, Santa Barbara
Assistant Professor

Michelle Brown’s research focuses on one of the main drivers of social variation: competition for food resources. She develops novel methods to disentangle the energetic effects of feeding competition among individuals, social groups, and species. Using information on the magnitude and timing of competition, she identifies its demographic effects on populations and tests hypotheses regarding collective behavior and social relationships. She conducts fieldwork on eight populations of wild monkeys at five sites in Uganda and co-directs the Biobehavioral Laboratory on the UCSB campus. She also works to diversify the fields of biological anthropology and animal behavior through extensive mentoring and training of students from under-represented groups in STEM fields.

Grants, Awards and Distinctions:

NSF Build & Broaden: “Extreme competition among primate species: Reproductive effects of feeding competition within a guild.” 2021-2023. $268,734. PI.

UCSB Academic Senate: “Resolving the progesterone paradox: Energy acquisition and reproduction in a wild primate.” 2020-2021. $10,864. PI.

UCSB Faculty Career Development Award: “Infrasonic communication in a cryptic primate.” 2020-2021. Percent effort: 1 summer month. PI.

Hellman Family Faculty Fellowship: “A monkey’s-eye view: Testing a novel framework for predicting feeding competition in primates.” 2017-2021. $31,570. PI.

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